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Dotcom will sue GCSB, lawyer says

Friday 07 Dec 2012 7:57a.m.

Dotcom will sue GCSB, lawyer says

Internet tycoon Kim Dotcom will sue the Government's spy agency for damages, his lawyer says.

Paul Davison QC says the claim will cover breaches of the law and intrusion of privacy.

Dotcom is able to sue because of a High Court ruling by Justice Helen Winkelmann, released yesterday.

She granted an application for the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) to be added as a defendant in the ongoing judicial review of the lawfulness of the police raid on Dotcom's mansion in January, when he was arrested on allegations of internet piracy and racketeering.

The agency has admitted it acted illegally when it spied on Dotcom and his associate Bram van der Kolk.

They are both New Zealand residents, and the GCSB is forbidden by law to spy on citizens or residents.

Mr Davison won't put a figure on the claim, Radio New Zealand reports.

Opposition parties say Dotcom will be able to sue the government, the GCSB and the police for millions of dollars.

Justice Winkelmann also ruled the GCSB must disclose when the police first asked it to intercept Dotcom's communications and hand over to the court all the information it gathered.

It must also disclose whether it gave the information to any other agency.

US authorities have laid charges against Dotcom and an extradition hearing is due to start next year, probably in June.

Dotcom previously said he would prefer not to sue because he loves living in New Zealand and doesn't want to burden taxpayers.

NZN

 
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