Wed, 23 Jul
° °
  • Firstline - TV3 New Zealand

    Firstline

    Weekdays 6am

  • 3 News - TV3 New Zealand

    3 News

    Nightly 6PM

  • Campbell Live - TV3 New Zealand

    Campbell Live

    Weekdays 7.00pm

  • 3rd Degree - TV3 New Zealand

    3rd Degree

    WEDNESDAYS 8.40PM

  • The Paul Henry Show - TV3 New Zealand

    The Paul Henry Show

    Weekdays 10.30pm

  • Three 60 - TV3 New Zealand

    Three 60

    Sundays 9.30am

  • The Nation - TV3 New Zealand

    The Nation

    Sat 9:30am / Sun 10am

Fonterra launches light-proof bottle

Thursday 21 Mar 2013 12:12p.m.

Fonterra launches light-proof bottle

Kiwi consumers will soon be holding the latest in bottle technology when pouring milk for their daily coffee.

Dairy giant Fonterra this morning announced a new triple-layer light-proof bottle, which they say will keep milk tasting fresh throughout its shelf-life.

Fonterra Brands managing director Peter McClure went so far as to call the technology, which will be in stores from April 8, a "game changer".

The opaque plastic bottle has a black layer in between two white layers to keep light entering and breaking down nutrients which alters the taste of the milk.

Fonterra says light begins to damage vitamin B2 in milk which releases free radicals and go on to react with other proteins.

When left in sunlight consumers can taste the difference light makes in six minutes while under fluorescent light it takes about two hours.

Fonterra group marketing manager Craig Irwin said he does not expect the price for Anchor milk to increase.

The new bottle will only be rolled out for the company's premium Anchor brand, but there was nothing stopping other brands from using the same technology, he said. 

The new bottle is the same shape and weight as the current design. It will also be recyclable.

Mr McClure said the product was part of the company's vision to get kiwis drinking more milk.

While New Zealand was the world’s biggest producer of dairy products, "it doesn't seem right that New Zealanders are drinking less milk per capita", he said.

He hoped because the milk would taste better for longer it would encourage more people to drink milk.

3 News

 
comments powered by Disqus