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Property market heat no surprise: English

Wednesday 14 Nov 2012 1:13p.m.

Property market heat no surprise: English

By Pattrick Smellie

Household incomes have increased by a third in the last four years, while average house prices have risen nationally by only 1.3 percent in the same period, making recent real estate market buoyancy unsurprising, says Finance Minister Bill English.

Appearing before parliament's finance and expenditure select committee today, Mr English appeared to have prepared the figures in advance for questions on the apparent heat in the Auckland housing market, where average prices have risen above pre-GFC peak levels.

"House prices on average have moved up one per cent in nominal terms. Disposable income is up a lot over that period," he said.

"We wouldn't be surprised to see a bit more interest going back into the housing market", especially with the lowest interest rates in 40 years.

Mr English tried to bat away opposition politicians who pressed him on forecasts from the Treasury, Reserve Bank and the International Monetary Fund of an unsustainably high current account deficit with the rest of the world over coming years.

He cited the Christchurch earthquake as adding around one percentage point to the forecasts, while expressing a personal opinion that the outlook for New Zealand was better than forecasters believe.

"I'm just a bit more optimistic," he said, since he doubted New Zealand would return to historic levels of debt accumulation.

"The fact is we are in a world that's pretty different because everyone's reducing debt."

Households were saving more, which forecasters had originally doubted would happen, and New Zealand corporate balance sheets were stable.

While public debt was growing in part because of borrowing to cover quake rebuild costs and to lean against the impact of the global recession, the government remained committed to a budget surplus by in the 2014/15 financial year.

The high New Zealand dollar was a "signal from the world" that New Zealand had "sound prospects of producing stable yields compared to other countries".

"Our problem is one of success."

The New Zealand economy would remain "patchy" and unpredictable. Growth in the first half of this year had been stronger than forecast, while the second half was turning out to be weaker than anticipated.

NZN

 
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