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VIDEO: Barack Obama's full inauguration speech

Tuesday 22 Jan 2013 6:00a.m.

VIDEO: Obama's inauguration speech

By Julie Pace with 3 News online staff

Asserting "America's possibilities are limitless", President Barack Obama has declared that a decade of war is ending and the nation's economy is recovering as he launched into a second term before a flag-waving crowd of hundreds of thousands on the National Mall.

"My fellow Americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it, so long as we seize it together," Obama said, moments after taking the oath of office on a crisp day in the nation's capital.

The president didn't dwell on any first-term accomplishments but looked to hard work ahead in a country still grappling with a sluggish economy.

"We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit," he said. “But we reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future."

Striving for equality

In what many saw as a progressive and ambitious speech, Obama pledged to work towards equal rights for women, homosexuals and immigrants.

“Our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law,” he said. “For if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.”

“Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity; until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. Our journey is not complete until all our children, from the streets of Detroit to the hills of Appalachia to the quiet lanes of Newtown, know that they are cared for, and cherished, and always safe from harm.”

Climate change pledge

Obama also pledged to respond to what he called "the threat of climate change”, despite trying and failing in his first term to get a climate change bill through Congress.

Obama said failing to take action would be a betrayal of the nation's children, and of future generations.

He said that while some might deny the "overwhelming judgment of science" - a reference to those who say they don't believe in global warming - no one can escape extreme weather like raging fires, drought and storms.

Thousands celebrate Obama’s second term

Hundreds of thousands of people fanned out across the Mall, and millions more watched on television, as Obama took the oath of office to begin his second term.

Sandwiched between the bruising presidential campaign and looming fiscal fights, Monday's inaugural celebrations marked a brief respite from the partisan gridlock that has consumed the past two years.

Standing in front of the flag-bedecked Capitol, he implored Washington to find common ground over his next four years. And seeking to build on the public support that catapulted him to the White House twice, the president said the public has "the obligation to shape the debates of our time."

"Not only with the votes we cast, but with the voices we lift in defence of our most ancient values and enduring ideals," Obama said.

Looking ahead to his second-term agenda, the president said the nation must "respond to the threat of climate change" and tackle the comprehensive immigration reform that has eluded Washington for years.

"Our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see America as a land of opportunity," he said.

Moments earlier, Obama placed his hand on two Bibles - one used by the Rev Martin Luther King Jr and the other used by Abraham Lincoln - and recited the brief oath of office. Michelle Obama held the Bibles, one on top of the other, as daughters Malia and Sasha looked on.

Vice President Joe Biden was also sworn in for his second term as the nation's second in command.

Monday's oaths were purely ceremonial. The Constitution stipulates that presidents begin their new term at noon on January 20, and in keeping with that requirement, Obama was sworn in Sunday in a small ceremony at the White House.

AP

 
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