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Kim Dotcom unveils the Internet Party

Wednesday 15 Jan 2014 9:42 a.m.

Kim Dotcom made the announcement on Twitter this morning

Kim Dotcom made the announcement on Twitter this morning

Kim Dotcom has revealed the name of his planned new political vehicle: the Internet Party.

The entrepreneur and alleged copyright pirate made the announcement on his Twitter account this morning, at the same time revealing the party's simple purple and white logo.

"My new political party won't be named Mega Party," he wrote, referring to his cloud storage service Mega.

"We are the Internet Party. Here's our logo for the first time."

Dotcom is not a New Zealand citizen, so will not be able to stand for election. It's believed he will instead take the role of leader or president.

The Internet Party will be officially launched on January 20, the second anniversary of the raid on his rented Coatesville mansion.

The launch will be followed by a free party at Vector Arena, which will also celebrate his 40th birthday and the launch of his album Good Times.

"Get ready for low blows and smear against me and my political party," Dotcom wrote on Twitter over the weekend. "My attackers are worried. They should be. We will get more than 5 percent. My political party will activate non-voters, the youth, the Internet electorate."

A spokesperson for the Electoral Commission told 3 News Dotcom has yet to register the party. Registration is required for parties that wish to compete for the party vote.

To register, the party must prove it has 500 or more financial members and a name that is not likely to cause offence or confusion, or which refers to a title or honour, or is too long.

The commission said the party's purple branding – somewhat similar to United Future's – probably wouldn't be a barrier to registration, which would be subject to public consultation.

United Future leader Peter Dunne declined to comment, saying he'd take a look at it during the party's registration phase.

Internet provider Orcon - also branded in purple - teamed up with Dotcom on an advertising campaign recently, but denied any involvement with the Internet Party, saying the purple branding was just a coincidence.

"Regarding the use of colour in his logo, you’ll have to ask Kim Dotcom about that. I guess he just might like purple too," says CEO Greg McAlister.

It's not known yet who the Internet Party's candidates will be at this year's election. Political commentator Bryce Edwards of Otago University says there are rumours a "well-known broadcast journalist" will put their hand up, and bloggers may also be in the mix.

Around the world there are already a few political parties with the Internet Party name, including Spain and Ukraine. It's not known whether Dotcom's party has formal links with any of them.

3 News

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